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Medisearch Clinical Trials

1419 Village Drive

St. Joseph, Mo. 64506

Medisearch Clinical Trials

1419 Village Drive

St. Joseph, Mo. 64506

PSORIASIS  

 

ENROLLING NOW

                             

 Study 1     PLAQUE PSORIASIS

You may be a candidate for this study if you:

  • Male or non-pregnant female at least 18 years of age

  • Has a clinical diagnosis of stable plaque psoriasis

  • Willing to comply with study instructions and commit to all follow-up visits for the duration of the study

Additional entry criteria apply. Qualified participants will receive related medical examinations and study medication at no cost, and may be eligible for compensation for their time and travel.

Study 2       ADOLESCENT PLAQUE PSORIASIS

You may be a candidate for this study if you:

  • Age 2 years or older

  • Chronic plaque-type psoriasis present for at least 6 months

  • Enrolling adolescents with  moderate to severe plaque psoriasis 

Additional entry criteria apply. Qualified participants will receive related medical examinations and study medication at no cost, and may be eligible for compensation for their time and travel.

What Is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease that causes raised, red, scaly patches to appear on the skin.  It typically affects the outside of the elbows, knees or scalp, though it can appear on any location. Some people report that psoriasis is itchy, burns and stings. Psoriasis is associated with other serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease and depression.   

 

How Do I get psoriasis?

While scientists do not know what exactly causes psoriasis, we do know that the immune system and genetics play major roles in its development. Usually, something triggers psoriasis to flare. The skin cells in people with psoriasis grow at an abnormally fast rate, which causes the buildup of psoriasis lesions.

Men and women develop psoriasis at equal rates. Psoriasis also occurs in all racial groups, but at varying rates. About 1.9 percent of African-Americans have psoriasis, compared to 3.6 percent of Caucasians.

Psoriasis often develops between the ages of 15 and 35, but it can develop at any age. About 10 to 15 percent of those with psoriasis get it before age 10. Some infants have psoriasis, although this is considered rare.

Psoriasis is not contagious. It is not something you can "catch" or that others can catch from you. Psoriasis lesions are not infectious.

What Type of Psoriasis Do I Have?

There are five types of psoriasis. Learning more about your type of psoriasis will help you determine the best treatment for you.

 

Plaque Psoriasis

Plaque psoriasis is the most common form of the disease and appears as raised, red patches covered with a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells. These patches or plaques most often show up on the scalp, knees, elbows and lower back. They are often itchy and painful, and they can crack and bleed.

 

Guttate

Guttate [GUH-tate] psoriasis is a form of psoriasis that appears as small, dot-like lesions. Guttate psoriasis often starts in childhood or young adulthood, and can be triggered by a strep infection. This is the second-most common type of psoriasis, after plaque psoriasis. About 10 percent of people who get psoriasis develop guttate psoriasis.

 

Inverse

Inverse psoriasis shows up as very red lesions in body folds, such as behind the knee, under the arm or in the groin. It may appear smooth and shiny. Many people have another type of psoriasis elsewhere on the body at the same time.

Pustular

Pustular [PUHS-choo-lar] psoriasis in characterized by white pustules (blisters of noninfectious pus) surrounded by red skin. The pus consists of white blood cells. It is not an infection, nor is it contagious. Pustular psoriasis can occur on any part of the body, but occurs most often on the hands or feet.

Erythrodermic

Erythrodermic [eh-REETH-ro-der-mik] psoriasis is a particularly severe form of psoriasis that leads to widespread, fiery redness over most of the body. It can cause severe itching and pain, and make the skin come off in sheets. It is rare, occurring in 3 percent of people who have psoriasis during their lifetime. It generally appears on people who have unstable plaque psoriasis. Individuals having an erythrodermic psoriasis flare should see a doctor immediately. This form of psoriasis can be life-threatening.

Source: www.psoriasis.org

 

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Medisearch Clinical Trials

1427 Village Drive

St. Joseph, Mo. 64506

816-364-1515

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Mon. - Thur.    8 am - 5 pm

Friday   by  Appointment

Sat.-Sun.  Closed

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